Here’s a piece of clarity for the morning. The guys at Granite Grok caught up with Senator John McCain in New Hampshire. They asked him a question about earmarks, and they recorded the answer. Transcribed:

Transparency and knowledge are the only antidote to the corruption that is bred by earmarks, the gateway to corruption.

I think that he’ll have trouble getting disagreement on that from the conservative blogosphere.

Categories: Ethics

5 Comments

neil · August 13, 2007 at 1:41 PM

Maybe so, but it doesn’t make a lot of sense. Congressmen are proud of their earmarks. Congressmen make earmarks so that their constituents will see that they bringing jobs and money back to the district. More transparency will only intensify the competition — who wants to deal with campaign commercials saying that you brought home less money than anyone but Ron Paul?

Transparency is a good thing where spending is concerned, but it’s not going to end or slow earmarks.

eye · August 13, 2007 at 1:46 PM

I think that the point is that it will be easier to find the corrupt ones.

neil · August 13, 2007 at 2:29 PM

Wake me up when someone suggests a method to find and terminate corrupt Pentagon contracts.

eyeon08.com » Barnes on GOP: Importance of earmarks and ethics · August 21, 2007 at 11:30 AM

[…] There has been a debate about whether earmarks are the problem and a good political issue. Patrick Hynes has taken the position that while they are bad, they are not a motivating issue. Ramesh Ponnuru has argued that there is not much there substantively. While I agree with the substance of their criticism, I think it misses the point. To quote John McCain, "earmarks are [the] gateway to corruption." The corruption in our party turns off a lot of voters. We are not talking about using this as an issue to fire up activists, we are talking about fixing the image. […]

The Tower: Surveying the Political World From High Above » Blog Archive » Eyeon08.com comments on McCain’s answer to GraniteGrok on earmarks: “the gateway to corruption”. · August 22, 2007 at 10:34 PM

[…] You can read the full text of the original article here.  You can contact The Tower at tower@campaignia.org.  […]

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